Helping to improve clinical risk, reduce litigation risk and improve healthcare standards.

Helping Manage Clinical Risk, Reduce Litigation Risk and Improve Healthcare Standards

In addition to latest news on THEMIS, you can find a selection of our latest clinical risk alerts here.

We provide our policyholders with clinical risk alerts based on advanced claims intelligence provided by our Lead Clinical Partner, TMLEP. These are provided to help keep clinical practice reactive to emerging clinical risk trends, ensuring we can help create a safer clinical world.

Severe Vitamin D Deficiency and Complications of Robotic Prostatectomy

Severe Vitamin D Deficiency and Complications of Robotic Prostatectomy

This article discusses the problems that may arise from severe vitamin D deficiency and the international guidelines that highly recommend that all adults should supplement to avoid complications that may be caused by this deficiency.

Read More
Bilirubin Screening Devices for Community Midwifes and GP Surgeries

Bilirubin Screening Devices for Community Midwifes and GP Surgeries

Jaundice in new-born babies is a common occurrence (60% of term babies and 80% of preterm infants) and is usually not harmful. Jaundice is caused by a build-up of bilirubin in the blood. Bilirubin is a yellow/orange pigment produced following the breakdown of red blood cells and as babies have a lot of red blood cells in their blood, the baby’s liver is not as effective at removing bilirubin from the blood so they can be passed in the baby’s stool. Usually at around the two weeks old, new-borns are producing less bilirubin and the liver is far more effective at removing this from the blood.

Read More
When Did This Tumour Start? The need for a Gompertzian Understanding of Tumour Growth Kinetics

When Did This Tumour Start? The need for a Gompertzian Understanding of Tumour Growth Kinetics

Tumour growth is conventionally understood to follow exponential kinetics in many medico-legal courts and summaries. According to this model, the time required for one cell to divide into two is equivalent to that required for two to form four, four to form eight, and so forth. As such, people from claimants to plaintiffs, physicians to patients, and scientists to laymen alike mistakenly assume that, upon determining the doubling time of a hepatic tumour, to give a typical example, the tumour would have likely been present “years ago” in the liver, and the cancer was thus “incurable” years ago. Alas, some say, there was no point in screening, testing, and diagnosing the primary tumour earlier, as it was fatal all along, owing to its metastatic spread. In other words, the patient’s tumour was metastatic well in advance of diagnosis and, hence, there would not have been any prospect of cure with earlier detection.

Read More
Strep A and the Risks of Delayed Diagnosis

Strep A and the Risks of Delayed Diagnosis

Strep A (group A streptococcus) is a highly contagious bacteria that can cause different infections ranging from minor illness to death in a very small number of cases. Often people can carry the bacteria without developing any illness. Strep A can be prevented though good hygiene but there is no preventative vaccine. The bacteria are often found in the throat and the skin hence it may be caught through close contact and via respiratory droplets.

Read More
Knee Osteotomies and the Importance of the Post-Operative Availability of the Surgeon

Knee Osteotomies and the Importance of the Post-Operative Availability of the Surgeon

Patients who suffer from osteoarthritis of the knee experience excessive wearing of the meniscus and articular cartilage. This is measured in grades from I-IV, from soft cartilage to cartilage worn down to the bone. This cartilage provides shock absorption and allows the bones to slide over each other. This damage can limit the ability of the knee to function properly.

Read More
Intestinal Obstruction: Importance of Proper Examination and History Taking

Intestinal Obstruction: The Importance of Proper Examination and History Taking

Intestinal obstruction occurs when food and stool are not able to move freely along the gut. There are many possible reasons for intestinal obstruction including hernias, tumours, abdominal adhesions, volvulus (intestine twists around itself) and foreign objects. Intestinal obstruction is a common problem with a high mortality rate unless treated promptly. Delays and improper management can cause infection, intestinal tear (perforation), pain, and death from the infection. An accurate history and examination are essential to lead to the correct investigation and management. That means doing the complete job and not moving forward until this is adequately done.

Read More
Previous Next
Mr Charles Willis-Owen BM BCh MA (Hons Oxon) MFSEM (UK) FRCS (Tr & Orth), Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon Royal Bournemouth Hospital

Enhancing Risk Management for Policyholders

By offering policyholders complimentary access to the very latest healthcare analytics updates from TMLEP, policyholders are kept up to date with access to clinical risk alerts that may impact their practice. As a THEMIS policyholder, this keeps clinical practice responsive to emerging trends that could lead to claims.

Mr Charles Willis-Owen BM BCh MA (Hons Oxon) MFSEM (UK) FRCS (Tr & Orth), Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon Royal Bournemouth Hospital
Apply for Protection